Brendan Sullivan

Brendan Sullivan

Brendan is a lawyer working in Hamilton Ontario at Harvey Katz law office. He has had the privilege of working closely with Harvey Katz and assists seriously injured people with claims arising from motor vehicle accidents, slip and falls, dog bites, life insurance denials and long-term disability. Brendan completed his articles in 2016 with a large insurance defence firm where he assisted with a seven week jury trial in Toronto. Brendan is a member of the Hamilton Law Association and the Ontario Trial Lawyers Association.

Distracted driving

There are many forms of distracted driving that can come up in motor vehicle accident litigation. During the examination for discovery process there will be questions posed by lawyers on both sides about whose fault the accident was.

Who pays for car accident injuries?

When someone gets injured in a car accident, the at-fault driver who caused the collision is usually responsible for providing compensation to the injured victim. Fortunately, drivers carry insurance to protect them if they cause an accident and need to pay compensation to an injured person.

What makes a dangerous step?

Stairs and steps in Ontario are regulated by law under the Occupiers’ Liability Act. According to section 3(1) an occupier owes a duty to take reasonable care to ensure persons on their property are reasonably safe.

Updated: What is the Threshold and who Meets it?

What is a ‘Form 1’ and why do I need it to get accident benefits?

If you are seriously injured in a car accident there are many benefits available that a personal injury lawyer can help you apply for. One of these benefits is called ‘attendant care’ and it relates to services provided around the home. Examples of attendant care include: dressing, undressing, grooming, preparing food, eating food, taking medication, bathing and exercising. Many seriously injured people have difficulty with …

What is Public Nuisance?

Public nuisance is unique and is a separate category in Tort from negligence. When considering public nuisance, the courts begin their inquiries based on the harm suffered and not on the property owner’s conduct. Therefore, the ‘reasonable steps’ to keep a premises safe are not relevant to a claim of a public nuisance.