Lawson Hennick

Lawson Hennick

Lawson is the founding lawyer of Hennick Law.

He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from York University, and then attended University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Law graduating with a Bachelor of Laws degree in 2009 before being called to the Ontario Bar in 2010.

Lawson articled with a boutique litigation firm where he gained experience in a variety of practice areas including representing Indian Residential School survivors to obtain compensation through the Independent Assessment Process for sexual and physical harms suffered.

Since his call to the bar, Lawson has devoted his legal practice exclusively to the area of personal injury law before starting his own firm and regularly acts for clients on injury claims including motor vehicle accidents, slip and falls, product liability and dog bite cases. He regularly appears before the Superior Court of Justice and has also appeared before the Financial Services Commission of Ontario (FSCO) and License Appeal Tribunal.

You can reach Lawson by e-mail at lhennick@hennicklaw.com

Sexual Abuse Damages In Ontario Not Subject To General Damages Cap

In the recent Ontario Superior Court decision of D.S. v. Quesnelle, Justice Smith made it abundantly clear that in Ontario, general damages caps do not apply in civil sexual abuse claims. This decision should be commended as the policy rationale for general damages caps in most other areas of personal injury are drastically different than in the context of sexual abuse cases.

Injured at an AirBnB? Liability implications for AirBnB and its millions of hosts

It is unclear how many of these 500 million confirmed guest arrivals have resulted in significant personal injury or property damage. However, chances are quite high that at this rate, it is only a matter of time before AirBnB personal injury litigation makes its way through our court system.

A Primer on Constructive Dismissal: Don’t Wait Until It’s Too Late

Constructive dismissal occurs when an employee quits their job in response to an employer’s fundamental breach of an employment agreement. In doing so, the employee treats the employment contract at an end.

Commercial Host Liability: Would You Like a Cab With That?

Commercial establishments in the business of serving alcohol must be aware of the legal responsibilities expected of them towards their patrons under the eyes of the law.

The “No Crash, No Cash” Rule on Public Transit Vehicles

Since May 10, 2011, Ontario riders on public transit vehicles who sustain injuries can no longer pursue accident benefits if the public transit vehicle they were riding in “did not collide with another automobile or any other object in the incident” as stipulated by section 268(1.1) of the Insurance Act R.S.O. 1990, c. I.8.

When it comes to motorcyclists, it’s a David v. Goliath world out there

When it comes to professional fighting, fighters in the ring are separated by weight class, which only seems fair. Yet, when it comes to Ontario’s roads, there’s no such separation between vehicles. Unfortunately, for motorcyclists in particular, this poses inherent risk when sharing road space with other vehicles ranging from cars to 18-wheelers.